Book recommendations for business leaders: 12/6/18

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Stephen King says that if you want to be a writer, there are two things you must do: read a lot and write a lot. This is about the “read a lot” part. I include reading lists and book reviews that will help you do business more effectively and write better for business.

In this post, I point you to reviews of Leap: How to Thrive in a World Where Everything Can Be Copied, Humble Leadership: The Power of Relationship, Openness, and Trust, Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most. Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People, and Leaders Ready Now: Accelerating Growth in a Faster World.

From Wharton: How Businesses Can Stay a Step Ahead of Copycats

“The threat of copycats is constant in business. Despite intellectual property laws, patent filings and market dominance, competitors will find ways to offer cheaper versions of a product. Rapidly advancing technology has served to accelerate the pace of replication, making it even harder for a company to maintain the top spot in any sector. Howard Yu, management and innovation professor at the IMD business school in Switzerland, offers some helpful insights in his new book, Leap: How to Thrive in a World Where Everything Can Be Copied.”

From Kimberley Barker: Humble Leadership: A positive book

“The book ‘Humble Leadership, The Power of Relationship, Openness, and Trust’ shares Ed and Peter Schein’s vision of Humble Leadership and the relationship theory that serves as its foundation. They share stories that give the reader an insight into what Humble Leadership is and what it is not. Then, they discuss trends that they see reinforcing here-and-now humility, personization (or the personal relational emphasis), group sense-making, and team learning; all key components of Humble Leadership. The book ends with a superb list of further reading, self-analysis, and skill building to enhance your own Humble Leadership proficiency.”

From Michael McKinney: Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most

“Some choices are easy like ‘Should I get vanilla or chocolate ice cream?’ Most of our decisions are like this, and the consequences aren’t life-changing. Most books on decision-making describe these kinds of intuitive, gut-reaction decisions. But not all decisions are of this type. Some are farsighted choices as Steven Johnson calls them in Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most. These are the big decisions—life choices—like should I move to Denver? Should I take that job? Should I move home? Should I buy that car? Should I buy the house? Should I get married?”

From Theodore Kinni: Leaders Should Focus on Human Dignity at Work

“With bankruptcy looming, management appealed to employees to accept pay cuts and ‘pull together and win.’ The workers did. After the company limped along for five long years, the turnaround came. The company’s leaders marked the occasion by giving themselves hefty bonuses, but didn’t bother to restore worker pay. A complete breakdown in the relationship between management and employees ensued, and Donna Hicks got a call.”

From Skip Prichard: Strategies to Accelerate the Growth of Your Leaders

“In Leaders Ready Now: Accelerating Growth in a Faster World, authors Matthew Paese, Ph.D., Audrey B. Smith, Ph.D., and William C. Byham, Ph.D. share their collective wisdom about talent and leadership. All three authors are employed by DDI helping organizations grow their own leaders.”

Michael McKinney, produces a list like this every month. If you want to know what great reading may be in store for you, Check out his “First Look: Leadership Books for December 2018.”

Reading recommendations are a regular feature of this blog. Want more recommendations about what to read? Check out my Three Star Leadership blog, Michael McKinney’s LeadingBlog, and Skip Prichard’s Leadership Insights.

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