Book recommendations for business leaders: 6/20/19

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Stephen King says that if you want to be a writer, there are two things you must do: read a lot and write a lot. This is about the “read a lot” part. I include reading lists and book reviews that will help you do business more effectively and write better for business.

In this post, I point you to reviews of Labyrinth: The Art of Decision-Making, Bravespace Workplace: Making Your Company Fit for Human Life, Connected Strategy: Building Continuous Customer Relationships for Competitive Advantage, How to Think Like a Roman Emperor: The Stoic Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius, and The Upset: Life (Sports), Death…and the Legacy We Leave in the Middle. Plus summer reading suggestions from the Columbia University business faculty.

From Michael McKinney: 16 Rules for Effective Decision-Making

“In Labyrinth: The Art of Decision-Making, Pawel Motyl examines ‘The most prevalent weak spots in decision-making processes, not only in business but in life in general; during crisis and calmer times; in both individual and group decisions.'”

From Skip Prichard: 7 Needs Work Should Fulfill

“Moe Carrick’s new book, Bravespace Workplace: Making Your Company Fit for Human Life, recognizes the importance of people so much that the dedication at the very front of it is ‘dedicated to workers everywhere. You are the heart of it all, and it’s what you do every day that makes your company great.’ How very true that is, and how incredible for Moe to recognize it even before page one.”

From Bob Morris: Connected Strategy

“Siggelkow and Terwiesch provide an abundance of information, insights, and counsel that will prepare almost any organization’s leaders to recognize a customer’s need, identify a product and/or service that will fill that need, request from the client feedback that either confirms the solution or modifies it to the client’s satisfaction, and then respond appropriately, thereby strengthening the relationship with the client. In other words, collaborate with a client to fill a previously unmet need.”

From Wharton: Life Hacks from Marcus Aurelius: How Stoicism Can Help Us

“Stepping back from emotional and physical chaos to reach a state of calm, clear-headed thinking is the bedrock of Stoicism, a philosophy famously practiced by Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius. Although Stoicism was conceived in ancient times, its guiding principles are very relevant today, according to cognitive behavioral psychotherapist Donald Robertson. His new book, How to Think Like a Roman Emperor: The Stoic Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius, examines how Stoicism informed the leader’s personal and political life. It also shows how the philosophy can help with the challenges of modern life, including work.”

From Kevin Eikenberry: The Upset: Life (Sports), Death … And the Legacy WE Leave in the Middle

“The Upset was written, with the help of John Driver (including chapters from family members) during this whirlwind of fame, awards, and the severe downward spiral of Tyler’s health. That alone makes this an inspirational story. But there is far more to Tyler’s story that an illness and a crazy love of Purdue athletics.”

From the Columbia University Business Faculty: Scholars’ Summer Reading Picks

“It’s summer, and many of us are scaling down our ambition — at least as far as reading lists go. Scholarly tomes are shoved to the back of the bookshelf. Out come lighter, more palatable novels and celebrity bios, ready to tote on vacation. Not so our Chazen Senior Scholars. They plan to use the coming months to stuff their capacious brains with ever more knowledge. We caught up with a few of them to find out what books they’d be cracking this summer.”

Reading recommendations are a regular feature of this blog. Want more recommendations about what to read? Check out my Three Star Leadership blog, Michael McKinney’s LeadingBlog, and Skip Prichard’s Leadership Insights.

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